Grandmother says dog attack left 6-year-old girl with 75 stitches to face

The city's bylaw enforcement office has "opened an investigation" into a weekend incident involving a dog, according to manager Bill Tetlor, who added he could not say more as the investigation is ongoing.

Grandmother alleges pit bull attacked little girl at a sleepover

(CBC)

A Windsor grandmother says her six-year-old granddaughter had to get 75 stitches to her face after being attacked by a dog.

In a series of Facebook posts beginning on Jan. 6, the woman wrote her granddaughter was attending a sleepover when she was attacked, leaving her with wounds to her head and leg that required dozens of stitches.

"Even in the face of tragedy and such an avoidable senseless event ... [she] never cried a tear and remained solid as a rock , superhero strength, ninja force, tsunami strength, like nothing I've seen before," the woman wrote Sunday.

Still no tears. She comes from a long line of strong women.- Pam Robertson, grandmother

In several posts she alleges the dog that attacked her granddaughter was a pit bull. CBC News has not verified the type of dog involving in the incident.

The little girl saw herself in the mirror for the first time Monday, said the grandmother, describing the child's reaction with a series of sad face emojis.

'I'm so thankful that she is so intelligent," she added. "Still no tears. She comes from a long line of strong women."

Bylaw enforcement investigating incident

Windsor police Sgt. Steve Betteridge confirmed the force recently received reports of a dog bite complaint involving a child, but an investigation determined there was no criminal element so the matter was passed on to the Windsor Essex County Health Unit.

The city's bylaw enforcement office has "opened an investigation" into a weekend incident involving a dog, according to manager Bill Tetlor, who added he could not say more as the investigation is ongoing.

Make sure you know the animals you're approaching and that it's not an aggressive animal or a wild animal.- Mike Tudor, WECHU

Mike Tudor, a manager for the environmental health department for the WECHU, said he could not speak to specific incidents, but said in cases involving bites or scratches from a dog the animal must be confined.

"We want to make sure rabies can't be transmitted at the time of the biting incident … and we want to make sure that the animal survives the confinement period, which would indicated the animal could not transmit rabies when the incident occurred."

He added the health unit warns people to be "wary" when dealing with animals.

"Make sure you know the animals you're approaching and that it's not an aggressive animal or a wild animal."

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