Ideas with Paul Kennedy

Ideas is all about ideas \x96 programs that explore everything from culture and the arts to science and technology to social issues.

  • 54:57
    If you typically eat three meals a day, then it's a choice you make more than one thousand times a year. And if you're like most people, that choice probably involves meat or dairy, or both. On top of that, many of the clothes we wear are made from animals. But can something that nearly everybody on the planet is doing ? and has been doing for millions of years ? be immoral?
    Jul 17, 2018
  • 54:58
    Eating meat: some say we've evolved to do it. It's in our DNA. It's how we got our big brains. Yet others, as far back as Pythagoras, have argued that eating meat is bad for our bodies, cruel to animals, and toxic to the planet. Now -- perhaps more than ever -- when it comes to the matter of meat, clear-cut answers can be hard to come by. Kevin Ball serves up the arguments.
    Jul 16, 2018
  • 54:56
    Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. His sensual, sculptural buildings reject the cold minimalism and glass boxes of Modernism, and the ornate flourishes of post-modernism. Gehry, now 88, became famous in his late 60s, when his extraordinary design for the Guggenheim Museum became a reality twenty years ago in Bilbao, Spain. A complex and engaging man, who's been open about his disdain for the media, gave IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 2.
    Jul 10, 2018
  • 54:58
    Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. His sensual, sculptural buildings reject the cold minimalism and glass boxes of Modernism, and the ornate flourishes of post-modernism. Gehry, now 88, became famous in his late 60s, when his extraordinary design for the Guggenheim Museum became a reality twenty years ago in Bilbao, Spain. A complex and engaging man, who's been open about his disdain for the media, gave IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 1 of a 2-part series.
    Jul 9, 2018
  • 54:56
    Gabrielle Scrimshaw delivers the third annual Vancouver Island University Indigenous Lecture on the challenges Indigenous youth face, what reconciliation looks like, and how people can engage on that journey.
    Jul 6, 2018
  • 54:57
    Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery and its legacy. In the second of his two-part series on slavery in colonial Canada, Kyle G. Brown explores the long-lasting ramifications of one of humanity's most iniquitous institutions.
    Jul 5, 2018
  • 54:57
    Canada's 150th anniversary highlighted its evolving relationship with Indigenous people. Too often in that history, voices other than those from First Nations did the talking for them. In this episode, Brielle Beardy-Linklater, Sandra Henry, and Theodore Fontaine tell their stories of struggle and resilience in their own words.
    Jul 2, 2018
  • 54:42
    Acclaimed Globe & Mail journalist Doug Saunders argues in his book "Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough" that Canada has had trouble keeping the immigrants it attracts. This "minimizing impulse", as he terms it, has to be jettisoned if Canada is to take its rightful place on the world stage.
    Jun 29, 2018
  • 54:42
    Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here? In the first of a two part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked-about aspects of our history. Part 1 of a 2-part series.
    Jun 28, 2018
  • 54:42
    Just over a decade ago, the iPhone was created, and its built-in camera soon sparked a photography revolution. We now use our smartphones to take an estimated 1.2 trillion images a year globally. We've gone from capturing "special" moments, to documenting virtually every aspect of our day. Printed photos in treasured albums have been replaced by intangible images -- casually shared on social media, and stored virtually in the Cloud. What are the upsides, and what are we losing? Photographers, curators, and thinkers reflect on how this new image culture affects us, as well as its surprising links to earlier eras of photography.
    Jun 26, 2018
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