BLACK MIRROR

Black Mirror fan spends weekend watching fantasy world where people are slaves to screens

What he saw was a nightmarish world where individuals were controlled by their technology, rather than the other way around, and he bore witness to it for the entire weekend.
(Shutterstock / Ronald Sumners)

Peter Russett, a 27-year-old devotee of Charlie Brooker's popular science-fiction Netflix series Black Mirror, recently encountered a dystopia that boggled his mind while diving into the show's brand-new 4th season.

Russett spent the weekend with his mouth agape, his eyes scarcely able to believe what they were witnessing. What he saw was a nightmarish world where individuals were controlled by their technology, rather than the other way around, and he bore witness to it for the entire weekend.

Ordering food in from his phone rather than daring to venture out and miss a moment of the show's drama, Russett says that he could not believe the way that the addictive and alluring nature of the digital revolution had gotten out of hand—in the series, that is—and was relieved that it was just a TV show.

"Of course these things probably won't happen, but you know? They conceivably could one day. It's terrifying," said Russett, before apologizing for not paying full attention to our next question because he was looking up more fascinating facts about the show.

"Apparently the series' title, Black Mirror, actually refers to the haunting reflection of yourself that you see blankly gazing back at you in a screen when that screen is turned off," said Russett, before pausing, confused. "Oh hold on, that sounds familiar—oh, I think I actually looked that up already a while ago, when my Netflix died. I definitely feel like I already did this. Unless I'm having déja vu. Ha that would be freaky, wouldn't it!"

"Anyway, the point is that this show—it's so daring. It's innovative, exploring new frontiers—I've watched it four times this weekend. It goes after stuff like… people getting lost in the same technology they thought would improve their lives, so you could see how—not now, of course, not now, but soon—we could fall into that kind of trap. Well, some people, anyway. I noticed it right away. Not gonna get me."

Russett's parting words, "Siri, play Black Mirror," were certainly as mystifying and confounding as the show of which he spoke, and this reporter's reply, "Ummm, I'm still here…" was met with an "Of course you are, Siri. You always are. Now play Black Mirror, Siri. Time for some irony."

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